Monday, September 28, 2009

The Best Privacy Trees! What to plant if you can see too much of your neighbors yard.

Are you enticed by the fall nursery sales ? Has their motto "Fall is for planting" started you thinking about one more project you could squeeze in before the winter months? It is true anyway. If you plant in the fall you gain the benefits of a full growing season while your plants develop strong root systems during winter months.

I am dying to plant a privacy screen like this one - The tree is a Pyramidal European Hornbeam (Height 40' width 25'.) It's columnar shape makes it ideal for planing along fences for privacy with out encroaching too far into the yard or the telephone/power lines above. image

Here is a smaller version - the tree is a Frons Fontaine Hornbeam and about half the size at maturity (height 25' width 10'). Because my back yard is small, long and narrow, I think that will go with the smaller tree. Plus with a name like Fons Fontaine it is sure to be a showstopper.

IMG_4193

I actually noticed this tree screen right after it was planted five years ago (just up the street from my mom's house) and got out of my car to hunt down the owner (I had to know what they were). Fortunately, she was outside and knew the name of the trees.

I can't believe how fast Autumn came this year - What are your trying to get done before the cold weather comes? And did you miss me while I was gone? I hope to be back posting twice a week or more. I sure missed you all!


11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Yeah, B. is back! Your ideas are both fabulous and timely. Emi

Anonymous said...

Yeah, B. is back! Your ideas are both fabulous and timely. Emi

Anonymous said...

I like hornbeams a lot. That was what our landscape designer specified for the area along our fence. I still may put them in, but they grow very slowly.

Margo said...

I sure have missed you...

Melissa B. said...

Did my email work or what??!! Just kidding. But I am glad your back, this was perfect. I have been wondering what trees to plant along my back fence for a small yard. Yah!!!

Melissa J. said...

So glad you're back! Can't wait to see what these look like in your yard. I need to always be a few months behind you in landscaping and decorating so I can take advantage of your fabulous ideas :)

MaryBeth said...

I just found your blog and read every single one. I thought great found a wonderful blog and she just stopped. So glad to see a few new post and can't wait for more.
I was told by my landscaper to wait until spring to plant again. I will look into your trees and see if they work for my area (Northeast) in PA. MB

Bethany said...

MaryBeth- Thanks for your comment. I am glad you found my blog (and stuck around for the sabbatical!)
Bethany

Cedar Roots said...

Loving this tree post, I just cut one down (it was dead) so I need to do some work in my yard, I think I am waiting until spring, we all have more money then, RIGHT?

Jim Lewis, Landscape Design Portland Oregon said...

I don't think we have hornbeam trees around our area. Never seen them in a nursery around here and I've seen or planted just about everything that grows here in Oregon.


What was more striking to me was that rock wall, though. Wow! That is some really nice work. Those kind of walls are rare and expensive around here because the ledgestone is about 5-10x more expensive than the native basalt rock we have.


Anyway, nice trees too. I just had to make a note of the wall in that last photo. I love that.


>Landscape Design Portland Oregon

Anonymous said...

I am a designer who has been using Hornbeam for screening along Lake Michigans Eastern coast. I would advise always making sure you have the european var. and columnar is better than pyramid because branch structure can open up mid height holes after 10 years.

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